WELCOME

TO THE

BERKSHIRES

WELCOME
TO THE
BERKSHIRES

Berkshire Map

Town of Pittsfield

Pittsfield is the phoenix of the Berkshires, having weathered several economic upturns and downturns, while always finding creative ways to reinvent itself. It’s the county seat, and also its commercial and business center. With its eclectic yet easy-to-navigate downtown, diverse population, more affordable real estate, and tight-knit business community, Pittsfield buzzes with commerce, arts, culture, and community. The city hosts a variety of special events, including an Arts Walk, a spring-through-fall Third Thursday street festival, and a summer farmers’ market.

BERKSHIRE MUSEUM

Small yet impressively varied, the Berkshire Museum hosts exhibits and workshops of art, natural history, and ancient civilization. It also houses a movie theater that showcases the best of independent film.

Colonial Theatre

Built 1903, this stunning historic theater presents a mix of live and filmed performances, comedy, community events, and other entertainment.

Berkshire Map
Adams Alford Becket Cheshire Clarksburg Dalton Egremont Florida Great Barrington Hancock Hinsdale Housatonic Lanesborough Lee Lenox Monterey Mount Washington New Ashford New Marlborough North Adams Otis Peru Pittsfield Richmond Sandisfield Savoy Sheffield Stockbridge West Stockbridge Tyringham Washington Williamstown Windsor

Adams

Town of Adams

This North County valley town was founded in 1778 by a group of settlers, including Quakers, whose Meeting House still stands today. It was named after revolutionary leader Samuel Adams (yes, that Sam Adams), and was originally a mill town, producing wool, cotton, lumber, and plastic. These days, Adams is known for its laid-back character and beautiful landscape, which offers multiple options for hiking, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing.

ASHUWILLTICOOK RAIL
TRAIL

The site of a Victorian-era rail line, this scenic trail is a must-stop. Ten feet wide, paved, and universally accessible, it traverses 12.2 miles of the stunning Hoosac River Valley.

SUSAN B. ANTHONY BIRTHPLACE MUSEUM

Suffragist leader Susan B. Anthony was born in this Federalist-style colonial in 1920. It’s now a learning center and museum dedicated to her early years and work as an activist, and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Alford

Town of Alford

Quiet, serene, and private, Alford is the town for those who love the feeling of a getaway, every day. A former farming town, Alford strictly controls its residential development to maintain its pastoral charm. It may not have stores, hotels, gas stations, or even a post office, but it does have plenty of wide-open fields, low-traffic roads, and mountain trails, making it the perfect place for biking, jogging, walking, and hiking. With its location between Great Barrington and the border of New York State, you’re always close to shopping and other conveniences.

ALFORD SPRINGS RESERVE

Nearly 900 acres of mostly forested ridgeline, plus stunning views of Mount Greylock and Tom Ball Mountain. The reserve has six miles of trails for hiking, snowshoeing, challenging cross-country Nordic skiing, and hunting. And tons of fresh, wild blackberries.

ALFORD BROOK

This peaceful brook, which runs into the Green River, isn’t just a great spot for a picnic. It’s also considered one of the best spots for fishing in the Berkshires.

Becket

Town of Becket

This town has always marched to the beat of its own drummer. It has deep entrepreneurial roots, and once boasted saw and grist mills, forges, tanneries, a glass company, and a trip-hammer operation, plus a variety of dairies. Although just 1,500 people lived in Cheshire in 1885, there were four different churches. Today, Cheshire’s rural character prevails, with hundreds of acres dedicated to skiing and hiking, as well as fishing in the Hoosic River.

THE DREAMAWAY LODGE

The longest-running dance festival in the country, Jacob’s Pillow brings an eclectic mix of internationally lauded dance companies to the Berkshires each year. In addition to year-round performances, the Pillow is an amazing educational resource for dance scholars and professionals.

JACOB’S PILLOW DANCE FESTIVAL

The longest-running dance festival in the country, Jacob’s Pillow brings an eclectic mix of internationally lauded dance companies to the Berkshires each year. In addition to year-round performances, the Pillow is an amazing educational resource for dance scholars and professionals.

Cheshire

Town of Cheshire

This town has always marched to the beat of its own drummer. It has deep entrepreneurial roots, and once boasted saw and grist mills, forges, tanneries, a glass company, and a trip-hammer operation, plus a variety of dairies. Although just 1,500 people lived in Cheshire in 1885, there were four different churches. Today, Cheshire’s rural character prevails, with hundreds of acres dedicated to skiing and hiking, as well as fishing in the Hoosic River.

ASHUWILLTICOOK RAIL TRAIL

The trail, which begins in Lanesborough and terminates in Adams, runs most of the length of the town. It’s a popular place for walking, biking, rollerblading, and jogging.

It’s not often you’ll find a monument to an enormous block of cheese. This massive cheese press commemorates a 1,200-pound dairy lover’s delight made by combining the milk of every cow in town and then gifted to Thomas Jefferson, bearing the president’s motto “Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God.”

Clarksburg

Town of Clarksburg

On the northernmost border of Berkshire County and Vermont, Clarksburg is known for its small-town feeling and scenic landscape, combining rugged hills with expansive plateaus and tranquil ponds. It’s home to a picturesque state park, and a portion of the Appalachian Trail crosses through town.

GOLDEN EAGLE RESTAURANT

Located on the Hairpin Turn of the Mohawk Trail, at 1,700 feet above sea level, this building, originally built in 1914, was once a gift shop for trail travelers. It’s now a place to enjoy food, drinks, and spectacular vistas.

CLARKSBURG STATE PARK

Camp, hike, ski, or go boating or fishing here. The park contains 368 acres of unspoiled hardwood forest, with memorable views of the Hoosac Range, Mount Greylock, and the Green Mountains.

Dalton

Town of Dalton

With its mix of rural and suburban neighborhoods and its compact downtown business district, Dalton has been growing in popularity among Berkshire professionals and families. It was originally a mill and farming community, and its proximity to Pittsfield made it a natural choice for small businesses. Crane & Co., which has made its home here since 1799, is the sole supplier to the US Treasury of cotton-based paper for currency.

The Stationery Factory strives to create community and commerce in the Berkshires and was purchased with the intent of developing the site into a thriving quality oriented marketplace and small business location for the community.

CRANE MUSEUM AND CENTER FOR PAPER ARTS

The Crane Museum of Papermaking is located in what was the rag room of Crane’s Old Stone Mill, dating back to 1844. The Museum opened in 1930 after an extensive renovation, making it one of the oldest corporate museums in the country.

Egremont

Town of Egremont

Egremont hews close to its farming roots, with 20 percent of the land still used for agriculture. It has a charming downtown with shops, cafes, and a post office. On the outskirts of town are dozens of options for outdoor recreation, including biking and walking; and hiking trails, a horseback-riding ring, tennis and volleyball courts, and ball fields at French Park. Egremont has lower property taxes than many of the Berkshires’ best-known towns.

CATAMOUNT SKI

One of the oldest ski areas in the Northeast, Catamount offers downhill skiing and snowboarding in the winter. Spring and summer are all about the Aerial Adventure Park.

EGREMONT COUNTRY CLUB

Tee up at this country club, which has an 18-hole public golf course, driving range, and fully stocked pro shop. Its restaurant is open daily in the warmer months, and has banquet facilities for up to 250 people.

Florida

Town of Florida

On the far northeast corner of Berkshire County, Florida abuts the Mohawk Trail in the foothills of the Green Mountains. The town’s portion of the Deerfield River is known for having the best trout fishing in the Berkshires. The Hoosac Tunnel, an active railroad tunnel that is widely considered one of the great engineering achievements of the 19th century, is located here. Easygoing and expansive, Florida offers a quiet, outdoorsy lifestyle that’s within easy driving distance of both the Central Berkshires and the Pioneer Valley.

For hiking, horseback riding, cross-country skiing, and some beautiful vistas of the Deerfield River, pay a visit to Monroe State Forest. You’ll also find remnants of the land’s farming past, including stone walls and cellar holes.

On 19 mountaintop acres, this hotel and banquet center boasts out-of-this-world views. It offers lodging, dining, and party facilities for weddings.

Great Barrington

Town of Great Barrington

Hailed as one of the top small towns in America by magazines such as Smithsonian and Vogue, Great Barrington is a melting pot of big-city ideas and small-town friendliness. Its downtown is bustling with shops, galleries, cafes, and restaurants. Night life is lively, with music, dozens of dining options, a movie and a live-performance theater, and a variety of special events. Venture outside to one of the region’s best farmers’ markets, plus an eclectic group of stores. Or get your outdoor fix with skiing and snowboarding at Ski Butternut, hiking on Monument Mountain, or kayaking and canoeing on Lake Buel.

W.E.B. DUBOIS NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE

This National Historic Landmark celebrates the early life of civil rights activist, author, and visionary W.E.B. Du Bois, who lived here for several years.

MAHAIWE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

This 1920s Art Deco theater hosts wide-ranging performances, from dance and musicals to stand-up comedy and opera.

Hancock

Town of Hancock

With its unusual “bowling alley” shape, Hancock stretches lengthwise across the border of the Berkshires and New York State, and touches seven different towns. It was named for a politician with a pretty famous signature, and has the lowest property-tax rate in all of Berkshire County. It’s both pastorally rich and forward-thinking, boasting both an awe-inspiring landscape, especially in the fall, and the county’s first wind farm.

JIMINY PEAK MOUNTAIN RESORT

The largest ski and snowboard resort in southern New England, Jiminy generates its own energy, including for snow-making, through wind power. A four-season resort, it also has a summer Mountain Adventure Park, and restaurant, conference, and wedding facilities.

IOKA VALLEY FARM

Stop at Ioka Valley for a maple sugaring tour, then stick around for pancakes topped with syrup made right here at the farm. Ioka Valley also sells specialty maple products, plus beef, pumpkins, squash, and Christmas trees, all grown or raised on premises.

Hinsdale

Town of Hinsdale

Settled in 1763 and originally called Partridgefield, after a wealthy benefactor, Hinsdale was renamed in 1804 after a family who owned the wool mill that supported the town’s economy for two decades. Calm, scenic, and open, Hinsdale is a good choice for those who like to have room to move—or to keep livestock and pets. Hinsdale also has five areas for camping.

BAS RIDGE GOLF COURSE

A public, 18-hole golf course with a rating of 63.7, Bas Ridge also has a bar and snack bar.

LAKE ASHMERE

Three of the town’s summer camps—Camp Ashmere, Camp Danbee, and Camp Taconic—are located along the lake. It’s also used for fishing, boating, rowing, and swimming.

Housatonic

Town of Housatonic

Although it’s classified as a small village at the northeastern edge of Great Barrington, Housatonic has a personality all its own. One of the region’s busiest mill towns in the 19th century, it has been reinvented as an outdoor and artist’s haven. Its buildings and landscape along the Housatonic River are a favorite subject for amateur and professional photographers, and there are several galleries and entertainment venues in its downtown. Housatonic is also a great place for biking, walking, and cross-country skiing, as well as youth basketball games at the Housy Dome.

BERKSHIRE MOUNTAIN BAKERY

Featured in the Netflix documentary Cooked, this is the original sourdough bakery in the Berkshires. Pick up a wide range of breads, pastries, desserts, and more.

BERKSHIRE PULSE

BERKSHIRE MUSEUM

With its mix of dance, world music, and movement arts, Berkshire Pulse is a dynamic place to for kids, teens, and adults to learn about and enjoy the benefits of movement and music.

Lanesborough

Town of Lanesborough

A center for agriculture and marble export during the 1800s, Lanesborough possesses some truly beautiful neighborhoods sited on old farmland. It also has a variety of restaurants, shopping areas, and places for family fun, including Mount Greylock, the Berkshires’ premier place for hiking. Lanesborough’s central location makes it easy to travel into Pittsfield and Lenox to the South or North Adams and Williamstown to the north, for even more entertainment and commercial services.

MOUNT GREYLOCK

There are no bad views from Mount Greylock, which rises 3,491 feet—the highest point in Massachusetts—and boasts dozens of moderate to advanced hiking and cross-country ski trails. Hike to the peak and visit the War Memorial Tower, or enjoy dinner and music at Bascom Lodge.

RAMBLEWILD

Whether you’re a beginner or an expert, you’ll have a blast in Ramblewild’s aerial adventure park, featuring obstacle courses and ziplining, plus hiking. It’s run by Feronia Forests, whose mission is to preserve ecosystems and educate the community about sustainability.

Lee

Town of Lee

After its mills folded in the early 20th century, Lee seemed destined to be a blip on the radar of New England history. But an extensive downtown revitalization project brought the town back to vibrant life, and its antique Main Street buildings onto the National Register of Historic Places. Known as the Gateway to the Berkshires, for its location right on the Mass Pike, the town has a variety of shopping, restaurants and bars, community services, and special events.

DOWNTOWN LEE

The heart of Lee’s business district, Main Street is on the National Register of Historic Places. You’ll find a range of cafes, restaurants, shops, and galleries here and on adjacent streets.

OCTOBER MOUNTAIN STATE FOREST

It’s hard to find a prettier place to hike than October Mountain, which is made up of 16,400 acres of forest and recreational preserve.

Lenox

Town of Lenox

Once the playground of the well-heeled from the Victorian and Industrial eras, Lenox has had a long love affair with artists and celebrities—from authors Nathaniel Hawthorn and Catharine Sedgwick to actress Fanny Kemble and musician James Taylor. It’s been the cultural heart of the Berkshires for centuries, which makes it one of the county’s most-visited towns. Postcard-pretty and cosmopolitan-minded, Lenox is chock-full of sites for hiking, biking, shopping, antiquing, art, golfing, lodging, and dining.

THE MOUNT

The summer “cottage” of novelist Edith Wharton, The Mount is now both a museum and a learning center, featuring talks by a host of well-regarded authors. Don’t miss the impeccably restored gardens.

PLEASANT VALLEY WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

Owned by the Massachusetts Audubon Society, this nature preserve features hiking trails, exhibits, and great spots for watching beavers, owls, and other wild creatures.

Monterey

Town of Monterey

Originally a part of neighboring Tyringham, Monterey is a relaxed, unspoiled town along the Mill River in the southern Berkshires. Brimming with wildlife and opportunities for outdoor recreation, Monterey is a fantastic choice for lovers of swimming, fishing, boating, hiking, cross-country skiing, and skating. Make a special stop at the Monterey General Store for snacks, housewares, and gifts. And don’t miss the dramatic vista of Lake Garfield and the forests surrounding it from the overlook at Beartown State Forest.

BIDWELL HOUSE MUSEUM

Built in 1760 as a parsonage, the Bidwell House is now a museum that documents early settlement of the Berkshires. The building and 192 acres of grounds and hiking trails have been authentically restored.

LAKE GARFIELD & TOWN BEACH

Hike through the forests, go fishing or boating, or relax along the shore of the 262-acre Lake Garfield.

Mount Washington

Town of Mount Washington

Located on a plateau in the Taconic Mountains, Mount Washington is the smallest town, by population, in the Berkshires. Petite in size but mighty in spirit, Mount Washington is ideal for those who love quiet and privacy, and being surrounded by the sights and sounds of nature. Its borders touch towns in Massachusetts, New York, and Connecticut.

Bash Bish Falls

Bash Bish Falls, a waterfall in Bash Bish Falls State Park in the Taconic Mountains of southwestern Massachusetts, US, is the highest waterfall in the state.

GARRETT GARDEN

This public park features a perennial garden, green, labyrinth, and arboretum. The green transforms into a playing field in the summer, hosting 10 Sunday-afternoon baseball games.

New Ashford

Town of New Ashford

New Ashford, tucked between Lanesborough and Williamstown, is one of Berkshire County’s smallest towns in land area, clocking in at 13.5 square miles. It was founded in 1762 and named for the town in Connecticut where its founders were from. Much like Dixville Notch, New Hampshire, New Ashford was once the first town to cast votes in presidential elections. Today it retains much of its original pastoral character and sweeping wooded landscape.

SADDLE BALL MOUNTAIN

The second-highest peak (after Mount Greylock) in Massachusetts, Saddle Ball is part of a series of outcroppings that wind along the southern ridge of the Mount Greylock range. A hike on Saddle Ball will take you through a variety of microclimates, with a variety of trees and dazzling wildflowers.

MILL ON THE FLOSS

Watch your meal of classic French country cuisine being prepared in the open kitchen of this restaurant, located in an 18th-century farmhouse. Mill on the Floss has been owned and operated by the same family for nearly a half century.

New Marlborough

Town of New Marlborough

One of the first Berkshire towns to be settled in the 18th century, New Marlborough is historic but not old-fashioned, sophisticated but never pretentious. Though just under 50 square miles, New Marlborough contains five villages: Clayton, Hartsville, Mill River, New Marlborough Village, and Southfield. Its scenic green is rimmed by a historic village center that buzzes with activity, especially in the warmer months. From its lakes to its forests and waterfalls, New Marlborough is relaxed New England living at its most beautiful.

DRY HILL

Open year-round, this nature preserve is made up of woods, ridgelines, summits, valleys, vernal pools, and other wetlands. It plays host to spectacular blooms of mountain laurel and other flowers, as well as dozens of woodland birds. Keep your eyes peeled for the black-throated blue warbler.

CAMPBELL FALLS

Located within Campbell Falls State Park, this dramatic waterfall drops 50 feet into a rocky gorge.

North Adams

Town of North Adams

A manufacturing powerhouse during the Industrial Revolution, with dozens of mills, machine shops, marble works, and carpentry businesses, North Adams has been reborn into a center of arts, culture, small business, and outdoor recreation. The Appalachian Trail runs through part the city, and has several scenic overlooks and wooded and pastoral areas. Many of the historic brick mill buildings have been repurposed into offices, co-working spaces, and art galleries. Bold, innovative, and forward-thinking, North Adams has become the go-to city for entrepreneurs, artists, and a variety of community organizations.

MASSACHUSETTS MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (MASS MOCA)

One of the largest and most celebrated museums and performing arts spaces in New England, MASS MoCA has distinguished itself with its diversity of thought-provoking modern collections and live music, dance, and performing art.

HOUGHTON MANSION

The former home of printing impresario Albert Charles Houghton, this lavish building has had a uniquely spooky history. It was featured on the Travel Channel show Ghost Adventures, but is not currently open to tours of the interior.

Otis

Town of Otis

Located in southern Berkshire County and close to the Mass Pike and points east, Otis is small and quaint, yet diverse in landscape. It features a large reservoir and several streams and ponds, plenty of wide-open fields and green spaces, and hills with elevations rising to nearly 2,000 feet. Otis is known for its laid-back attitude, and its residents’ love of the outdoors.

OTIS RIDGE

Since 1947, this ski area has almost 100 percent snowmaking capacity. It offers both day and night skiing.

OTIS RESERVOIR

Created by dam at the confluence of three ponds, the reservoir was originally used for powering the mills along the Farmington River. Seasonal and year-round homes have been built all around the reservoir, which is open to fishing, boating, and canoeing.

Peru

Town of Peru

Settled in 1767, the town, so the story confusingly goes, was named “because it is like the Peru of South America, a mountain town, and if no gold or silver mines are under her rocks, she favors hard money and begins with a P.” Peru rocks the highest town elevation in Massachusetts, at over 2,000 feet. Two large and beautiful wildlife management areas reside in the northern and southern thirds of town, and the east has a number of scenic brooks. Located on the eastern edge of the Berkshires, Peru provides unspoiled natural beauty and a relaxed home haven, especially for those commuting to Pittsfield, Northampton, and Springfield for work.

DOROTHY RICE WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

Tranquil and spectacularly beautiful, this nature preserve has 286 acres of hiking and walking trails through and around woodlands, meadows, and a pond.

PERU STATE FOREST

his enormous park, covering 2,750 acres of trails and scenic vistas, is ideal for hiking, birdwatching, snowmobiling, hunting, and fishing. At Garnet Peak, visit the memorial to World War II paratroopers whose transport plane crashed on the mountain in heavy fog.

Pittsfield

Town of Pittsfield

Pittsfield is the phoenix of the Berkshires, having weathered several economic upturns and downturns, while always finding creative ways to reinvent itself. It’s the county seat, and also its commercial and business center. With its eclectic yet easy-to-navigate downtown, diverse population, more affordable real estate, and tight-knit business community, Pittsfield buzzes with commerce, arts, culture, and community. The city hosts a variety of special events, including an Arts Walk, a spring-through-fall Third Thursday street festival, and a summer farmers’ market.

BERKSHIRE MUSEUM

Small yet impressively varied, the Berkshire Museum hosts exhibits and workshops of art, natural history, and ancient civilization. It also houses a movie theater that showcases the best of independent film.

Colonial Theatre

Built 1903, this stunning historic theater presents a mix of live and filmed performances, comedy, community events, and other entertainment.

Richmond

Town of Richmond

Richmond has long been one of the Berkshires’ most desirable towns, thanks to its spectacular rolling landscape, secluded neighborhoods, and impressive estates, many of which have remained in the same families for generations. Its Central County location means you’re never far from modern conveniences and entertainment, yet it’s full of places for biking, hiking, snowshoeing, or cross-country skiing, or canoeing and kayaking on Richmond Pond. The town also boasts some of the best apple picking in the region.

BARTLETT’S ORCHARD

Now run by the fourth generation of Bartletts, this orchard produces 20,000 apples on 52 acres of orchard each year. Pick your own, or head to the farm store for bagged apples, cider doughnuts and other pastries, and apple cider.

RICHMOND POND

Canoeing, kayaking, fishing, and swimming are all popular at this 218-acre pond. Its town beach is a great place to kick back and relax with a book, or set up a play date for the kids.

Sandisfield

Town of Sandisfield

Large in land area yet small in population, Sandisfield is a scenic town along the Farmington River Valley. It has historically been a logging town, even to this day, but also features several farms, orchards, and nurseries, as well as small businesses. Outdoor recreation is serious business in Sandisfield, with a state forest, two rivers, and two parks.

SANDISFIELD ARTS CENTER

Built in 1839 as a Baptist meeting house, this building now offers a range of live performances, exhibits, and workshops.

NEW BOSTON INN

Once a popular stagecoach stop, the inn is the oldest in Berkshire County. It also has a restaurant and tavern, a parlor for friendly gathering, and outdoor gardens.

Savoy

Town of Savoy

On the northeastern border of Berkshire County, Savoy’s roots are in agriculture and lumber. It’s a small and quiet community, with a pretty landscape of sweeping panoramic views and tree-lined neighborhoods. The northern part of town is home to several brooks and a portion of the Deerfield River. Savoy is convenient to both North and Central Berkshire County, as well as to towns in the Pioneer Valley.

SAVOY MOUNTAIN STATE FOREST

With its secluded location, Savoy Mountain doesn’t get as much traffic as some of its neighbors; this makes for a peaceful and unhurried hiking experience. The highest point is Borden Mountain, at about 2,500 feet. There are also four ponds and two waterfalls, including Tannery Falls, which plunges dramatically into a pool from nearly 100 feet up.

Sheffield

Town of Sheffield

Made up of two villages and a varying landscape that includes floodplains, wetlands, fields, and mountain slopes, Sheffield is practically the postcard for bucolic New England towns. It’s the oldest town in the county, founded in 1724, and sticks close to its agricultural roots. Only 2.5 hours from New York City, it’s a favorite of second-home owners and professionals who frequently commute in to the city. Sheffield has a small business district, as well as a growing arts scene. It’s also widely known as one of the hottest antiquing spots in the area.

ASHLEY HOUSE

The former home of Colonel John Ashley, one of the town founders and a supporter of the American Revolution. It was also the home of the slave Elizabeth Freeman, or Mum Bett, who sued Ashley for her freedom and won—and helped end slavery in Massachusetts.

SHEFFIELD POTTERY

One of the country’s premier clay makers and ceramics supply stores, Sheffield Pottery is a mecca for ceramics artists of all levels.

Stockbridge

Town of Stockbridge

The names Norman Rockwell and Stockbridge go hand-in-hand, thanks to the artist’s many works based on his town—the community still reenacts his Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas painting each year during its holiday festival. But it was also the home of luminaries like sculptor Daniel Chester French and the Sedgwick family. With its antique look and busy shops, galleries, and cafes, the downtown makes a worthy day trip at any time of year. Or go hiking, kayaking, boating, swimming, or paddleboarding on Stockbridge Bowl, one of the most scenic spots in the Berkshires.

KRIPALU CENTER FOR YOGA & HEALTH

For decades, Kripalu has been known for its health and wellness programs, including yoga, meditation, and nutrition. It offers a comprehensive slate of programming throughout the year, with workshops on fitness, creativity, writing, and personal and spiritual connection.

NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM

The world’s largest collection of original Norman Rockwell art resides here. The museum also presents the best in American illustration, photography, and animation, and hosts numerous workshops and artist talks.

West Stockbridge

Town of West Stockbridge

West Stockbridge might seem like the little sister to Stockbridge, but its profile has been rising over the past decade, thanks to an influx of new residents and businesses. Its sweet, walkable downtown is the major draw, but it also boasts two of the county’s best restaurants, as well as a growing arts scene. Like many towns in the Berkshires, West Stockbridge also has dozens of outdoor activities, from canoeing, kayaking, boating, and fishing, to biking, walking, and hiking. Or visit the pick-your-own farms for apples, blueberries, and pumpkins, or go foraging for wild foods.

SHAKER MILL BOOKS

SHAKER-MILL-BOOKS This extensive shop specializes in new books about the Berkshires, as well as used, rare, and out-of-print books.

TURN PARK ART SPACE

A former marble quarry, Turn Park has been transformed into an open-air museum, sculpture park, and performance space. It also hosts community markets and events.

Tyringham

Town of Tyringham

Settled in 1735, Tyringham was once home to a Shaker community with the holy moniker of Jerusalem. It’s now an easygoing rural community, with wide-open fields and meadows abutting green forests and swooping hills. Close to Lee and the Mass Pike, Tyringham is a terrific home base for those who love peace and quiet but still want to be close to modern conveniences.

TYRINGHAM COBBLE

Formed from millennia-old tectonic shifts that created a high ridge topped by exposed bedrock, this nature preserve features orchards, forests, fields of wildflowers, and panoramic valley vistas at the summit.

ASHINTULLY GARDENS

Composer John McLennan created these interconnected gardens over a 30-year period. With their elegant design and intimate feel, they’re an inspiring place to walk, relax, and reflect.

Washington

Town of Washington

This small town went through three name changes before being named after George Washington. A mountainous town bounded by October Mountain and the Appalachian Trail to the west, it was a stop on the stage road from the east into Pittsfield. Rural then and today, what Washington doesn’t have in industry it makes up for in natural beauty. Many residents enjoy a variety of winter spots, including cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, and snowshoeing.

OCTOBER MOUNTAIN STATE FOREST​

It’s hard to find a prettier place to hike than October Mountain, which is made up of 16,400 acres of forest and recreational preserve.

Appalachian Trail

Jump on the Appalachian Trail! Washington to Dalton is a 17.4 mile lightly trafficked out and back trail located near Hinsdale, Massachusetts that features a great forest setting and is rated as moderate.

Williamstown

Town of Williamstown

Williamstown has been included in no less than a dozen best-of travel articles, in The New York Times, Architectural Digest, Conde Nast Traveler, Curbed Boston, and more. This is partly thanks to its quintessential New England look, walkable downtown, and dozens of choices for arts, culture, and dining. It’s the home of the highly regarded Williams College, as well as a world-class art museum and summer theater festival. Williamstown’s location and eclectic character makes it a favorite among professionals, academics, families, and artists alike.

WILLIAMS COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART

A fascinating and expertly edited collection of visual art, owned and managed by Williams College. The museum also offers public programs.

’62 CENTER FOR THEATRE AND DANCE

As architecturally beautiful as it is innovative in its programming, the ’62 Center was created as a performance venue for Williams College student actors, dancers, designers, and musicians. It hosts a variety of open-to-the-public student and professional performances year-round.

Windsor

Town of Windsor

Founded in 1771, Windsor was originally a mill, farming, and logging community. With its many wildlife areas, breathtaking vistas, ponds, and unspoiled woodlands, Windsor has dozens of opportunities for hiking, hunting, kayaking, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing. It’s home to the Eugene Moran Wildlife Management Area, and parts of the Savoy and Peru Wildlife Management Areas also cross into the town.

NOTCHVIEW

Set on 3,100 acres, Notchview is a top pick in the winter for snowshoeing and Nordic skiing, on 17 kilometers of groomed cross-country and 8 kilometers of skate-skiing trails. It also offers trails for “skijoring,” or skiing with dogs (no kidding!). Notchview is open year-round for hiking and birdwatching.

WINDSOR STATE FOREST

Looking for a place to hike, explore waterfalls, horseback ride, mountain bike, cross-country ski, or swim? Windsor State Forest has it all. Don’t miss the Windsor Jambs waterfall, which splashes into a gorge from nearly 80-foot-high granite walls.

We want you to love living in the Berkshires as much as we do.

At Jan Perry Realty, we take the stress and frustration out of home buying and selling in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts. We’re your personal guides before, during, and after purchase, to make it as efficient and headache-free as possible—so you can get down to the serious business of enjoying your new place.

We want you to love living in the Berkshires as much as we do.

At Jan Perry Realty, we take the stress and frustration out of home buying and selling in the Berkshires of Western Massachusetts. We’re your personal guides before, during, and after purchase, to make it as efficient and headache-free as possible—so you can get down to the serious business of enjoying your new place.